Article
Challenge
Thanks!
Challenge us!
1


Burma


Burma is a remarkable country: the country that separates India from Southeast Asia remained closed since 1962, under the control of a series of military dictatorships. Today Burma calls itself Myanmar and is opened to tourism. The money generated helps the development of the country, and also helps the government to eradicate separatist armies in the bordering regions.

2





Tourists walking down this "trendy" country will discover a scenic countryside, quiet and religious people and the remains of a great civilization: the ruins of the Burmese empire.

3


Bagan


Bagan is one of those places sheltering the remains of a glorious past. One of those places out of time that transports travellers on unusual shores and unknown arts. Bagan, the former and first capital of the Burmese empire, is a portal toward these stories of adventures in the ancient India, and these temples that we believe disappeared.

4





And they have indeed disappeared. Thirty years ago, there was only here ruins of temples and thousands of collapsed buildings because of successive earthquakes. Thousands of piles of red bricks and broken arches: a dream for archaeologists.
But that's not knowing the Burmese mind. They are so proud of their ancient temples. They are renovators, sculptors, builders. A temple damaged in Burma is immediately rebuilt through donations of time or money from the Buddhist faithful.

5





A field of ruins of the size of Bagan could only attract a wave of renovations and reconstructions. Despite the dismay of archaeologists and historians, these majestic temples arose in the plains, this lost art, that this manual people has recreated, reappeared. In the thirteenth century, the fervor of the Christian rose cathedrals in France. The twenty-first century, Buddhist fervor has nothing to envy to our ancestors.

6





I arrived in this huge site in the late afternoon of July 14th. I met there two French women that I accompanied to see the sunset from the top of a pyramidal temple. I discovered, when I was cycling, the extent of this place. Between the cultivated fields, there are large and small temples everywhere!

7





Later, with more French people, we celebrate the French national day singing proudly La Marseillaise, our anthem. We drank abundantly to the Nation.

8





That night, I planted the tent near a large temple glowing in the dark.
It is forbidden to camp in Bagan. Thus I hid behind a grove of trees and folded the tent at dawn, while witnessing the spectacle of pale light on the hot stones.

9





I spent a second night under the tent the next day before giving up, for the third night, in a comfortable bed and air conditioning room.

10





Using an electric bike, I easily moved on sandy paths between the temples. For three days I visited the area. There are more than 2800 temples and some farming villages. Some temples glow a restful peace, sheltering a beautiful Buddha statue. Others are bigger and attract more tourists and many sellers.
Noisy vehicles are prohibited on the entire Bagan area (spanning 50 km2) which has the blow of a narcotic calm.

11





Burmese people use an unusual way to harass you in order to sell their touristic products. They follow you in the great temples, sympathizing and becoming improvised guides. They serve you then they ask you loyally to take a look at their stall. These people have an infinite patience. It is difficult to avoid them around the major temples.

12





The temples are built of red bricks. On these bricks, a white coating is originally applied forming splendid frescoes. Inside, we sometimes find old murals. Some of the best renovated temples are crowned with golden domes.

13





When we stand on the roofs of temples, we can observe the view of hundreds of red bricked buildings between the dark green trees beyond which emerge silhouettes of great majestic temples. It is very hot in the area but the proximity of Irrawaddy River makes the red soil a fertile soil. Locals plow it in the morning with plow and oxen.

14





It was a great experience to get lost in this timeless place and out of human activity. Amazing exploration days, celebrating evenings and waking up at the foot of temples. A successful conclusion to my trip to Myanmar. A last clear sky before facing back the monsoon in coastal cities.

1


Burma


Burma is a remarkable country: the country that separates India from Southeast Asia remained closed since 1962, under the control of a series of military dictatorships. Today Burma calls itself Myanmar and is opened to tourism. The money generated helps the development of the country, and also helps the government to eradicate separatist armies in the bordering regions.





Tourists walking down this "trendy" country will discover a scenic countryside, quiet and religious people and the remains of a great civilization: the ruins of the Burmese empire.


Bagan


Bagan is one of those places sheltering the remains of a glorious past. One of those places out of time that transports travellers on unusual shores and unknown arts. Bagan, the former and first capital of the Burmese empire, is a portal toward these stories of adventures in the ancient India, and these temples that we believe disappeared.





And they have indeed disappeared. Thirty years ago, there was only here ruins of temples and thousands of collapsed buildings because of successive earthquakes. Thousands of piles of red bricks and broken arches: a dream for archaeologists.
But that's not knowing the Burmese mind. They are so proud of their ancient temples. They are renovators, sculptors, builders. A temple damaged in Burma is immediately rebuilt through donations of time or money from the Buddhist faithful.





A field of ruins of the size of Bagan could only attract a wave of renovations and reconstructions. Despite the dismay of archaeologists and historians, these majestic temples arose in the plains, this lost art, that this manual people has recreated, reappeared. In the thirteenth century, the fervor of the Christian rose cathedrals in France. The twenty-first century, Buddhist fervor has nothing to envy to our ancestors.





I arrived in this huge site in the late afternoon of July 14th. I met there two French women that I accompanied to see the sunset from the top of a pyramidal temple. I discovered, when I was cycling, the extent of this place. Between the cultivated fields, there are large and small temples everywhere!





Later, with more French people, we celebrate the French national day singing proudly La Marseillaise, our anthem. We drank abundantly to the Nation.





That night, I planted the tent near a large temple glowing in the dark.
It is forbidden to camp in Bagan. Thus I hid behind a grove of trees and folded the tent at dawn, while witnessing the spectacle of pale light on the hot stones.





I spent a second night under the tent the next day before giving up, for the third night, in a comfortable bed and air conditioning room.





Using an electric bike, I easily moved on sandy paths between the temples. For three days I visited the area. There are more than 2800 temples and some farming villages. Some temples glow a restful peace, sheltering a beautiful Buddha statue. Others are bigger and attract more tourists and many sellers.
Noisy vehicles are prohibited on the entire Bagan area (spanning 50 km2) which has the blow of a narcotic calm.





Burmese people use an unusual way to harass you in order to sell their touristic products. They follow you in the great temples, sympathizing and becoming improvised guides. They serve you then they ask you loyally to take a look at their stall. These people have an infinite patience. It is difficult to avoid them around the major temples.





The temples are built of red bricks. On these bricks, a white coating is originally applied forming splendid frescoes. Inside, we sometimes find old murals. Some of the best renovated temples are crowned with golden domes.





When we stand on the roofs of temples, we can observe the view of hundreds of red bricked buildings between the dark green trees beyond which emerge silhouettes of great majestic temples. It is very hot in the area but the proximity of Irrawaddy River makes the red soil a fertile soil. Locals plow it in the morning with plow and oxen.





It was a great experience to get lost in this timeless place and out of human activity. Amazing exploration days, celebrating evenings and waking up at the foot of temples. A successful conclusion to my trip to Myanmar. A last clear sky before facing back the monsoon in coastal cities.

.