Article
Challenge
Thanks!
Challenge us!
1


Goal
Challenger: Gautier

Go up and down the Machu Picchu by foot

2


Challenged to Pierre


To accept such a challenge, I must do it in its entirety. That's why I left Cusco in a minibus that brought myself and a group of fellow travellers, one being from Chile and the other from Korea to a hydroelectric dam and there I began to follow the railway track.

3





It's actually one of two railways used to reach the site, the other one is longer (80km). On the road, we avoided the trains of the PeruRail company - or we tried to hang on to it...

4





The railway follows the Urubamba River and cut through the valleys

5





Two hours later of big steps, we spotted some stone walls on the mountain. We had arrived at Aguas Calientes.

6





In the early morning of the next day, we woke up around 4am because the pedestrian ascent takes a good hour. It passes through a bridge above the Urubamba River. The former Inca bridge had been destroyed by order of the Incan Emperor to cut the direct access to the city.

7





And here we go... ascent for hundreds of steps. The bus taunted us half an hour later, by meandering past us on the curvy road that now provides access for those less adventurous or able. Those other tourists enjoyed the Machu Picchu before the courageous climbers - us.

8





I had a short rest with some Argentine people and Stacey, my new Australian friend.

9





What a view!

10





We did it! We found our guide with his red and white flag in front of the entrance.

11





And here is our reward.

12





We then had a guided tour by an Inca descendant that was very passionate.

13





The terraces are impressive.

14





The boy school was separated from the girl school.

15


The Machu Picchu was a work in progress.


On the side of this mountain, there were stones intended to strengthen the site but didn't get used because of the arrival of the Spanish.

16





An inhabitant of the site, the vizcacha slept on an unfinished wall which had collapsed.

17





We examined the stones, they are not straight carved. We guess that the polishers did not have the time to achieve their job properly.

18





When the tour ended, some tourists climbed the Huyana Picchu - the mountain behind the Machu Picchu.

19





Meanwhile, we went to see the door of the sun (Intigate).

20





From there, we saw the white zigzags. This is the road of the buses. We were at the river this morning, what a walk!

21





We were still looking for the sun. But then it followed us and gave us a very sunny end of the morning.

22





I spotted a lizard who apparently knew how to avoid the glance of tourists. But it does not work with me!

23





With my adventurous companions of the day, Stacey and Bastian from Germany, we took our last beautiful photos and videos of the site. This day was memorable from the beginning to the end!

24





And finally here is the bridge used by the Inca people to flee in the jungle. This bridge would have held more than five centuries. It is also said that tourists try to enter to the site from there to avoid the expensive entrance ticket!

25





A small photo of a llama to finish.
You have to know when some of these free lamas fall from the top of the site, they are simply replaced.

26



A last one

We never want this kind of day to finish but we must leave: the minibus waited for us at 2.30pm and it's 12:30. Bastian and I are still on the top of the site. Two hours to go down and follow the railway, will we make it?
Small question to Gautier: Do you validate this challenge?

1


Goal
Challenger: Gautier

Go up and down the Machu Picchu by foot


Challenged to Pierre


To accept such a challenge, I must do it in its entirety. That's why I left Cusco in a minibus that brought myself and a group of fellow travellers, one being from Chile and the other from Korea to a hydroelectric dam and there I began to follow the railway track.





It's actually one of two railways used to reach the site, the other one is longer (80km). On the road, we avoided the trains of the PeruRail company - or we tried to hang on to it...





The railway follows the Urubamba River and cut through the valleys





Two hours later of big steps, we spotted some stone walls on the mountain. We had arrived at Aguas Calientes.





In the early morning of the next day, we woke up around 4am because the pedestrian ascent takes a good hour. It passes through a bridge above the Urubamba River. The former Inca bridge had been destroyed by order of the Incan Emperor to cut the direct access to the city.





And here we go... ascent for hundreds of steps. The bus taunted us half an hour later, by meandering past us on the curvy road that now provides access for those less adventurous or able. Those other tourists enjoyed the Machu Picchu before the courageous climbers - us.





I had a short rest with some Argentine people and Stacey, my new Australian friend.





What a view!





We did it! We found our guide with his red and white flag in front of the entrance.





And here is our reward.





We then had a guided tour by an Inca descendant that was very passionate.





The terraces are impressive.





The boy school was separated from the girl school.


The Machu Picchu was a work in progress.


On the side of this mountain, there were stones intended to strengthen the site but didn't get used because of the arrival of the Spanish.





An inhabitant of the site, the vizcacha slept on an unfinished wall which had collapsed.





We examined the stones, they are not straight carved. We guess that the polishers did not have the time to achieve their job properly.





When the tour ended, some tourists climbed the Huyana Picchu - the mountain behind the Machu Picchu.





Meanwhile, we went to see the door of the sun (Intigate).





From there, we saw the white zigzags. This is the road of the buses. We were at the river this morning, what a walk!





We were still looking for the sun. But then it followed us and gave us a very sunny end of the morning.





I spotted a lizard who apparently knew how to avoid the glance of tourists. But it does not work with me!





With my adventurous companions of the day, Stacey and Bastian from Germany, we took our last beautiful photos and videos of the site. This day was memorable from the beginning to the end!





And finally here is the bridge used by the Inca people to flee in the jungle. This bridge would have held more than five centuries. It is also said that tourists try to enter to the site from there to avoid the expensive entrance ticket!





A small photo of a llama to finish.
You have to know when some of these free lamas fall from the top of the site, they are simply replaced.



A last one

We never want this kind of day to finish but we must leave: the minibus waited for us at 2.30pm and it's 12:30. Bastian and I are still on the top of the site. Two hours to go down and follow the railway, will we make it?
Small question to Gautier: Do you validate this challenge?

.